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Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
28.06.01

Story

SPARE a thought for the carers of people with Alzheimer’s Disease! That was the heartfelt plea from Jean Bailey, care support officer for the Derby branch of the Alzheimer’s Society, prior to the start of Alzheimer's Awareness Week on Sunday. Mrs Bailey told the Trader: “Carers desperately need support. They are looking after someone who has the fourth fastest growing illness in the world but they often don’t realise they have to look after themselves. “They need our support because it is a long hard road.” She continued: “I can hear the absolute horror in the voices of relatives when they ring me. “You can feel the anguish when a relative says - ‘my mother has Alzheimer's, what am I going to do?’ “ “They sound totally devastated.” Mrs Bailey spoke of the everyday problems carers suffer. She added: “Carers suffer from loneliness and isolation. It’s so incredibly hard for them - they often can’t get out and can’t do normal household things like going shopping and they are usually very, very tired.” She also highlighted the importance of raising awareness of the impact of dementia. She said: “Dementia is an evil disease. It is important to highlight the impact dementia has on everyday life and how people with dementia and their carers cope with the challenges dementia brings.” The Derby branch has organised collections at Tesco in Mickleover on Saturday, July 6 and July 7. Mrs Bailey added: “ I am making an urgent appeal for people to come along and give generously to our collections. “Come and support us - you can make a difference.”


Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
21.06.01

Story

IF you’ve got a problem, come along! A network of police surgeries has been set up in the Sinfin, Littleover and Mickleover areas to make officers more accessible to their communities. And Sergeant Dave Simmonds told the Trader yesterday (Wednesday): “We are convinced that a lot of people have local problems but don’t think that ringing the police is justified because they think we’re too busy. “They think ‘our problem is minor, we won’t bother the police.’ “ He added: “These new surgeries are for people just like that. No matter is too small if they have a policing concern in their neighbourhood. I encourage these people to attend. “From Monday we will hold weekly meetings so that people know where and when to find their local officer.” More beat bobbies will also be returning to Derby streets as part of this ongoing re-organisation of Derbyshire Police Sgt Simmonds said: “The introduction of beat constables is another important initiative because people like to see police officers walking and patrolling the area. “We have consulted with local agencies, residents and neighbourhood watch groups and their reaction to these new initiatives was very positive. “They made it clear that they feel much safer and more confident with beat constables around. “They are delighted that a named and known officer is patrolling the beat.” He added: “These new initiative shows that the police are being pro-active rather than reactive. “We will talk to residents and plan solutions and identify problems and trends rather than just reacting to problems “We are confident that these initiatives will help continue our fight against crime.” The new beat constables are PC Nick Daines (Stenson Fields), PC Tex Avery (New Sinfin), PC Letti Ramwell (Old Sinfin), PC Keith Bird (Sunnyhill), PC Ted Turner (Blagreaves), PC Carol McDonald (Littleover), PC Kate Bateman (Mickleover) and PC Ian Furniss (Heatherton).


Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
June 7, 2001

Story

A TASK force has been set up to tackle the ‘sex market’ in Normanton. The group includes local residents, support agencies, Derby City Council, Social Services and the police. The task force will meet and refer back to the Crime and Drug Abuse Advisory Group. Sally Butler is a member of the group which has been set up by Derby City Partnership to develop projects to solve problems in the area. She told the Trader: “There has been a significant sex market in Normanton for a number of years. “It is very early in the process but the task force will try and identify what is happening and try to find solutions - both short-term and long-term. “For example, the group may look at street lighting in Normanton and see if that adds to the problem.” She added: “It is very important to involve local residents in this group because they know all about the anti-social problems that go hand-in-hand with prostitution. “The group will also look at the possibility of a link between the sex and drug markets in Normanton.” She continued: “Prostitution was identified as a problem through consultation with local residents, who are fed up with it and its knock on effects. “The issue of prostitution is a priority and the group will explore the real causes of the problem.” Derby city councillor Maurice Burgess attended the initial meetings and told the Trader: “I got involved in the task group because I am a local councillor and local resident. “It is important to raise the profile of Normanton and one of the ways of doing this is to look at the reasons why girls get involved in prostitution.” He added: “Local residents are unhappy and hopefully, the group can tackle the problem effectively and eliminate it.” Derby City Partnership was awarded £6.8 million of government funding under round six of the Single Regeneration Budget. It will be spent in Normanton, over the next seven years, tackling social and economic problems, reducing crime and drug abuse and developing community involvement and leadership.


Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
17.05.01

Story

A POLICE scheme to eliminate the problem of nuisance youths has been set up in Mickleover. Mickleover Action Group was formed to try and tackle the problems in the area. Tony Williams, chairman of the action group, told The Trader: “Local people have noticed a significant increase in the problems caused by children and young people in Mickleover. “This is evident in certain ‘hotspots’ within the village and the incidents are occasionally serious but mainly can be categorised as minor crimes and general anti-social behaviour.” He added: “Gangs of youths cause damage to property, intimidate the elderly and the young and use alcohol and drugs.” And now Derby Police has set up Operation Ladder - a new scheme to tackle the problems. WPC Kate Bateman, police representative in the action group, said: “ We have problems in Mickleover - especially ‘hot spots’ in Bramblebrook Park near Devonshire Drive and Vicarage Park near Ladybank Road. “Gangs of youths congregate in the area - some from other areas - and mainly make a nuisance of themselves and intimidate people.” She continued: “Operation Ladder has now been set up to tackle the problem. A van with video surveillance equipment will patrol the area on Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights and there will be a mobile phone aboard the van. “People in Mickleover who have had problems with the youths before will be given the mobile number.” She added: “If they see any trouble, they can ring the number and the van will proceed to the scene. “There are two advantages in the scheme. Firstly, ringing the mobile number will be quicker because ringing through to the police control number is often frustrating. “Also video equipment is very useful because it acts as a deterrent because youths don’t want to get caught on film. “This operation will enable more effective policing and monitoring of the situation in Mickleover.” The next meeting of the action group takes place at Mickleover Community Centre on May 24 at 7.30pm.


Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
12.04.01

Story

A DERBY voluntary group is celebrating after a National Lottery grant saved it from the threat of folding. Austin Community Enterprises (ACE) has received £78,794 from the National Lottery’s Community Fund. The non-profit making organisation provides opportunities of training, support and advice to the local community and was established in 1994. It operates an advice centre on Browning Circle in Old Normanton and in 1996 began an after-school childcare service offering child care to residents. The ACE Club, based in the ACE Childcare and Training Centre on Grange Avenue, Derby, offers child care places for two to four-year-old children five mornings a week. It has a well equipped play area and fully qualified staff. Charles Gilbert, centre manager of ACE, said: “This grant is absolutely vital. It was tremendous news when we found out. This money will now secure our future for the next two years.” He continued: “Half of the money will help us to continue to run our advice centre on Browning Circle, Old Normanton, and the other half will help us to continue to run the childcare and training centre on Grange Avenue, Derby.” He added: “This money is so vital to enable us to provide key services for local residents. “We are a voluntary, non-profit making organisation and we are very short of funds and this grant will make a huge and substantial difference.” He continued: “The advice centre was in serious danger of folding and the childcare centre was struggling to break even so you can imagine how important the money is.” Joe Allen, the National Lottery Community Fund’s regional awards committee chair, said: “We are renewing our commitment to supporting those at greatest disadvantage in society - by making sure the process of getting much needed funding is as straightforward and accessible as possible.” Groups wanting an application from should contact 0845 791 9191.


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
29.03.01

Story

A BID for more than a million pounds which could help tackle crimes such as prostitution, burglary and robbery in Derby is one step closer this week. The Derby Crime and Disorder Partnership has applied to the Home Office for £1,177,330, of funding to provide 62 CCTV cameras in inner city areas. It was told this week that it was one of 26 projects in the East Midlands to be short-listed and now has eight weeks to put together a final detailed bid. Derby City Council deputy leader, Councillor Chris Williamson, told the Trader: “We are extremely pleased to have got through to the next round, but are not counting our chickens just yet even though it is encouraging. “I think CCTV will act as an important deterrent, and it will be crucially important in terms of making people feel more secure.” If approved, the CCTV system would be controlled from Roman House and would take in areas including The Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, Rose Hill, Osmaston Road, The Arboretum, Siddals Road and council owned properties at Rivermead House and Britannia Court. Councillor Williamson continued:“Much of the problem is fear of crime - which is often far worse than the actual crime itself. It will make people feel more secure living in their homes and walking the streets.” He added: “It will have a deterrent affect on anti social behaviour and incidents of serious crime such as prostitution, drug trafficking and robbery. These crimes don’t happen every minute of every day, but they are incidents which have got worse, and it’s no good pretending that there is not a problem.”


Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
March 8, 2001

Story

MOTORISTS have been given tips on how to avoid increased rush-hour traffic congestion in Derby city centre. The advice comes as the city council moved this week to the second phase of a half a million pound project around the Cockpit Island. The city council is spending a £500,000 grant on an impact-resistant safety fence, renewal of the road surface and replacement of corroded sections on Holmes Bridge. A spokesperson for Derby City Council said that traffic leaving the city centre from the Cockpit Island has now been reduced to one lane. The council say motorists should • Use other forms of transport. • Stagger their journeys. • Leave more time for their journeys. The spokesperson added: “With the previous stage, congestion wasn’t bad but with the new phase starting it is going to get worse. “There will inevitably be longer delays and congestion will be worse in the evening than in the morning because Holmes Bridge is a way out of the city for most people.” “The more sensible people are, the better it will be.” Figures from Derby City Council reveal that, on average, 2,500 vehicles use the island in the evening peak (4pm-6.30pm) and 2,000 vehicles in the morning peak (7.30am-9.30am). The work is expected to last for two to three weeks.


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
February 22, 2001

Story

A £38,000 cash boost could help Sinfin parents back to work. The grant will help groups set up cheaper childcare facilities during the next year. The money has been handed over to Community Enterprise and Training Association (CETA), by the Derby City Partnership. One group to benefit - Rascals at St Stephen’s Church in Sinfin Lane - says the cash will help them provide childcare for more parents. Mother, and chair of the group’s management committee, Fiona Priestley told the Trader: “The cash will be a great help. At the moment we are open for two hours a day but once we have clearance from social services - which should be at Easter - we plan to open from 7.30am-6.30pm, and should be able to take on more children.” She continued: “The money will help us set up a business plan so that in a year’s time we can operate on our own without funding. ” “A lot of child care groups are too expensive for some parents. We allow parents to pay for the amount of time their children are looked after, rather than for a whole session. We also offer care for children up to 12-years-old rather than eight-years-old which is the case with some places,” added Fiona. CETA will work closely with the community groups offering advice on recruiting qualified staff, getting funding, putting together business plans, and making sure their childcare facilities are properly set up and registered. The grant from the Derby City Partnership came from funds provided for the regeneration of Sinfin and Blagreaves under round three of the Government’s Single Regeneration Budget programme (SRB3). Chair of the partnership, Councillor Amar Nath said: “Lack of childcare can often be a major barrier in preventing single parents’ access to education and employment opportunities.” He added: “We hope that over the coming year, groups in the Sinfin area will become self sufficient in developing and providing childcare provision to the local community, leading in turn, we hope, to better opportunities and a better quality of life for parents and children.” For more details on Rascals telephone 775379.


Author:
Steve Eyley
Date:
January 25, 2001

Story

THANK YOU!!! The Exeter Arms Breast Cancer Appeal has got off to a flying start in its bid to reach its £3,000 target. In last week’s Trader, we revealed that the appeal is aiming to raise money for the Breast Cancer Unit and Chemotherapy Suite at Derby City General Hospital between now and the start of May. With the campaign just one week old, £450 has already been raised. Generous regulars and visitors to the Exeter Arms, based at Exeter Place, have already chipped in to the tune of £250 and now members of the car bodies department at Adtranz have donated £200, which was raised by holding a raffle. In a tie-in with the Derby Trader Baby of the Year 2001 competition, sponsored by the Eagle Centre Market traders, the traders have agreed to give 50p to the appeal for each baby photo that appears in the Trader. Last week, Exeter Arms landlady Ann Wild, who helped launch the appeal, urged as many mums as possible to enter their tiny tots into the competition. Not only could they win a selection of great prizes and a prestigious title, they would also be helping a worthwhile local cause. Those prizes include vouchers to spend in the Eagle Centre Market and a selection of glassware from Derwent Crystal Ltd. In addition, the Trader is to give the top three babies framed copies of their photos. People who haven’t got a youngster aged 0-2 to enter into the competition needn’t despair as they can still get involved in the appeal. Ann, who lost both breasts four years ago and launched the appeal as a way of saying thank you to hospital staff for the care and support she received, explained: “If there are people who haven’t got young kids but want to help the appeal, they can make donations at a number of places in the Eagle Centre Market, particularly at Pete’s Heel Bar. “They can also come to the Exeter Arms and make donations here. What we want is for as many people as possible to come down here and put their hands in their pockets to help this appeal. We want this really good start to continue.” For details about the Derby Trader Baby of the Year 2001 competition turn to page


Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
January 11, 2001

Story

A DERBY retired teacher’s chief has slammed news that girls as young as 11 can obtain the morning-after pill without their parents’ permission. Etwall’s John Port School is one of six schools across the country who can now offer emergency contraception on demand to girls below the age of consent, as well as those of 16 and over. Parents will be informed if the pill is available at each school, but because of confidentiality rules, will not be told if their daughter receives it. David Slater, chairman of the City Of Derby’s Retired Teachers, speaking to The Trader after their annual luncheon at the Midland Hotel on Monday expressed his dismay. He said: “I am totally and utterly opposed to this plan. “The availability of the pill will certainly increase the pressure on girls to have sex and will make it more difficult for girls to refrain. “The fact is, if anything goes wrong they can simply go and get a pill - there is no responsibility. He added: “I think making contraceptives available like a magic pill is giving out the wrong message. “Girls should be encouraged to delay having sex - this is giving youngsters the go-ahead to have sex at an even younger age.” Dr Michael Crane, headteacher of John Port School, said: “We informed parents in September that the governors had agreed to offer the scheme. “The school - in the light of the fact that the pill will become available over the counter within the next few months - wanted to offer it in a safe and secure environment and by someone the school and pupils trust. “It will be dispensed in a highly confidential way. “I don’t think availability will increase the amount of teenagers having sex - I think research would show that this is not necessarily the case. “In terms of questions of responsibility, I think the majority of teenagers are responsible. He added: “We have looked at the moral and ethical issues and the pros and cons and have decided it was the way forward for the school.” *What do you think of John Port’s decision and the retired teacher’s comments? Let us have your views by writing to Letters, The Trader, 52 Babington Lane, Derby DE1 1SX.


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
December 14, 2000

Story

THE Trader, its readers and Asda Sinfin have rallied around for a superb finale to the Derby Lions Christmas appeal. Back in October, the Trader and Derby Lions launched an appeal to collect as much non-perishable food as possible to be distributed to the needy and elderly over the Christmas period. In a break with tradition, the management of the Derby Trader decided not to send out Christmas cards and gifts this year, but to buy £100 of food from Asda Sinfin to donate to the appeal instead. Asda then announced that it too would like to contribute and donated food valued at £50. And, Trader readers also gave a further boost to the collection by dropping off bags and bags full of donations at our offices in Babington Lane. Trader editor Patrick O’Connor commented: “In the past the Trader has sent out large numbers of gifts and greetings cards to advertiser and contacts. “But we have decided to end this practice and to give the savings to the Christmas Appeal which is a very worthy charity which this newspaper has had a long association with. “I am also very grateful that Asda has decided to support us in such a wonderful way. And of course Trader readers have responded marvellously by dropping in donations to our office in Babington Lane.” Lions appeal co-ordinator Brian Burke said: “We are really very pleased. It’s smashing that the Trader and Asda have made donations, because the more food we collect, the more parcels can be delivered to those who need them.” Asda’s events co-ordinator Vicky Timmins said: “The new store has been up and running since March and it is our aim to make it a store of the community. We just hope that everyone has a nice Christmas.” A total of 46 city schools also had collection points, and once the Lions have gathered up all the donations, they will be bagged up and distributed to the needy by the Sidney Street Community Centre, Boulton Lane Baptist Church, Derby City Mission, St Bartholomew’s Church, Victim Support, Queen’s Hall Methodist Church, Brunswick Street Gospel Hall, The Liversage Trust, Age Concern and the Soldiers, Sailors and Airforces Association (SSAFA). Lions secretary Malcolm Stirk said: “From the welfare point of view, the Lions get a lot of satisfaction from collecting the food for the appeal. One of my first jobs when I joined 26 years ago was to pack Christmas appeal bags.” He continued: “I think that we will have collected more than 5,000 items - which will beat last year’s total of 4,550.” Brian added: “We would just like to say a big thank you to the Queen’s Hall Methodist Church for helping the Lions over Christmas, for letting us use their building for packing and for making us very welcome.”


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
November 23, 2000

Story

AN OAKWOOD man says he feels violated after constant attempts to steal his motorbikes. Since January, Gavin Wilsoncroft (21), has had two motorbikes stolen - one of which twice - and last week his back fence and back door were smashed in as thieves attempted to steal a Honda 100 motorbike from his kitchen. When the thieves realised the bike wasn’t working because of a faulty clutch, they smashed it up instead. He told the Trader: “It has put me off having a bike, but the problem is that I’ve not got a full driving licence and have no other form of transport. I work in Spondon which is five-miles away and a long way to walk. “The way things are going, it looks as though I’ll have to sleep with the bike in my bedroom, because whatever I do is not enough.” • In January Gavin’s Honda 50 - which was locked up - was stolen from his garden in Oakwood. • In May, his new Honda 100, which was also locked up, was stolen from his mum’s garden in Spondon, although it was later found. • A month later, the same Honda 100 was stolen from his back garden in Oakwood. He received a call from the police on Saturday to tell him his bike had been recovered, only to find that it had been burnt out. • Last week thieves smashed though his front door in an attempt to steal his Honda 100. Gavin continued: “The police say there’s only so much they can do. They have taken finger prints but have not caught anyone.” “This time it’s more serious because they broke into my house. Even though they couldn’t steal the bike, they stole my watch, ring, motorbike leathers, two helmets and a pair of gloves.” He added: “I’m starting to wonder whether someone has got something against me, even though I’m harmless. It’s got to the stage now where I’m thinking about moving because I feel violated now that my house has been broken into.” Acting sergeant Ian Elliott, of Roe Farm Police station in Chaddesden, said: “Vehicle crime is no bigger problem that any other crime, and every crime which is reported to the police is investigated as best we can.” He continued: “If a bike is stolen, and it’s number plate is kept on, we will only be aware that it’s stolen if a vehicle check is carried out.” He added: “What usually happens is that the number plates are taken off and then the bikes are used for riding around on playing fields.”


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
November 16, 2000

Story

AN ELDERLY Derby woman was pressurised into paying £1,000 for her drive to be resurfaced - after originally being quoted £15! The incident - which involved a woman in her 70s - has prompted a fresh warning from Borrowash Police. A team of five/six men called at the lady’s home last week (November 9) in a brown transit van and talked her into having her drive resurfaced. According to the police, the woman went to the shops and then returned to find her driveway badly resurfaced. One of the gang then attempted to charge her £1,600 for the work before she agreed to pay £1,000. Police spokesman PC Mark Phillips said: “We urge and advise residents of any age to consider seriously about having any work carried out to their properties - as a result of a door caller without an appointment.” He continued: “It is always advisable to seek two to three written quotes and never to pay anyone more than the original estimate.” He added: “It never ceases to amaze me however much publicity we give to this type of incident, that there’s always someone willing to pay over the odds for poor quality standards of work. Reputable companies should always be used.” Anyone with information about the incident should call the police on 01773 570100.


Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
2.11.00

Story

THE heat will be on for a Mickleover woman when she walks across blazing wood embers for charity! Cynthia Buckley, of Darwin Road, will walk across the embers - burning at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit - at the Mackworth Hotel on November 23. She is trying to raise funds for the Myasthenia Gravis Association - a national medical charity (based in Derby), which gives support to people with Myasthenia Gravis and their families. It is a serious neurone-muscular disease and from the same family as Multiple Sclerosis and Motor Neurone disease. Cynthia has been a member of the association since it was founded in 1968 and is the current secretary. She told The Trader: “My mother died from the disease 26 years ago and its one of the reasons I got involved with the charity and why I’m taking part in the event. “I am quite nervous about it because I don’t know what it is going to be like. “I haven’t done anything like this before and haven’t spoken to anyone who has done it either. “I’m not good with heights so I’d prefer walking over hot embers than do something like abseil.” She has to go through a two-hour motivational training session before attempting the walk and a team from Blaze - the event organiser - will be on hand to coordinate safety precautions. The two hour session, coordinated by Blaze, encourages participants to focus and stay positive. The charity is still looking to recruit more big-hearted individuals to take part in the challenge. Marilyn Caladine, clerical officer at the Myasthenia Gravis Association, said: “The event is very important to us as a medical charity. “Our aims are to increase public and medical awareness and raise funds for research to find a cure. “We often have exciting national fund raising challenges - parachute jumps, plane pulls and abseils. “This particular one is a local challenge and another five or six participants would make the evening go with a real sizzle.” You have to sign up and collect at least £50 in sponsorship money to participate. It is open to anyone over 16 (under 18s will require parental consent). Anyone who wants to take part in the challenge should ring Alasdair Nimmo on 290219 or e-mail him on alasdair@mgaderby.fsnet.co.uk.


Author:
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Date:
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Story

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Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
July 24, 2000

Story

CHILDREN in Chellaston are taking their lives into their own hands going to school. That’s the view of a residents’ leader after an increase in traffic congestion in the area. Mr John Bowden, chairman of Chellaston Residents Association, told the Trader this week: “Many people will think that it’s just a ‘not in my back yard’ issue but it’s not.” “We are very concerned that since the A50 opened access to the A514, larger vehicles are using it as a route and causing immense amounts of congestion. The situation has become a nightmare.” Mr Bowden added: “The A514 is an important access route for schools with mothers and fathers delivering and collecting their children from school. Residents are horrified by the impact of these larger vehicles in the area around schools. “It is now a safety hazard - there is an accident waiting to happen and we want to stop it before it happens. Mr Bowden is looking for new measures to be bought in to stop the accident occurring. He has flagged up two methods to improve the situation. “The solution to the problem is some sort of weight restriction and we’re disappointed that the council have refused to support us. It is simple - you apply restrictions at the Shelton Lock Bridge and then larger vehicles can simply not cross the bridge. “We’ve also written to some organisations who use larger vehicles to ask for their drivers to take alternative routes and the response has been very positive!” ChellastonTory councillor Dave Black supports the stance taken by local residents. “Before the A50, there was no access for heavy goods vehicles into Chellaston. Now 40 tonne juggernauts are constantly using the access route and this causes heavy traffic and congestion. “Residents are rightly asking for changes. I am with the people of Chellaston who want the problem tackled.” Councillor Sara Bolton, executive member with responsibility for economic prosperity, said: “We have investigated the situation as a whole and the officer who dealt with it recommended not to take action at the moment. “In spite of this we still certainly haven’t ignored the situation.” •What do you think about the traffic situation in Chellaston? Let us have your views by writing to Letters, The Trader, 52 Babington Lane, Derby DE1 1SX.


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
17.08.2000

Story

ONE of Derby’s most prominent and successful mayors is out of work. Councillor Sara Bolton - who was the city’s 1999/2000 mayor - took voluntary redundancy from her job with PowerGen two weeks ago. During her year in office, Councillor Bolton carried out 1,342 engagements, raised more than £92,000 for local charities and only had one day off. She told the Trader: “I returned to work having had a year off to carry out my mayoral duties and was offered the choice of a new position or voluntary redundancy, so I decided to leave.” At the moment, Councillor Bolton’s days are spent being a full-time councillor for the Chaddesden ward, a member of Derby City’ Council’s cabinet, and a magistrate - all of which are unpaid. She continued: “I think with my successful fundraising skills during my year in office, it might be useful for any large company to employ me. But, I have been unemployed for just two weeks, and am trying to take life easy after my busy year. “It’s not until you stop that you realise how hard you have worked, and I do now appreciate nights in front of the telly with a bottle of wine.” Even though she is out of work, Councillor Bolton still gets up at 6am for a morning swim. She said: “I’m still doing my health regime, and my fruit bowl has followed me from the mayor’s office. “I have also had about 25 requests to talk at group meetings - which I don’t charge for - I just ask for a donation which will be given to my charities - The Samaritans, Derby Age Concern, Derby City General Hospital’s baby care unit, and the city hospital’s Breast Test Appeal, so I’m still raising money even though I’m no longer mayor.” She added: “At the moment, I’ve got a chance to slow down a bit - I carried out a charity parachute jump, took voluntary redundancy and became 40 all in one week - so life has begun!”


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
July 10, 200

Story

DERBY’S first Waste Week looks set to be held in October. The city council will join forces with local environmental groups to promote the recycling of rubbish - and will be only the third city in the country to carry out such a project. The council’s executive member with responsibility for the environment Councillor Ron Blanksby said: “This is a project which we are just thinking about. The first meeting on Tuesday was held to draw up a list of ideas. We are going to try and involve local environmental groups, schools and individuals to raise the profile of waste management and disposal in the future.” He continued: “This is going to be a major problem for all local authorities in the future - as well as nationally. The Government has said that we have got to increase our targets over the next few years.” He added: “At the moment, Derby is doing particularly well with recycling and waste targets and is just meeting them - but this is nowhere near the targets the Government wants us to meet in the future.” Ideas suggested for the Waste Week include an environment bus tour of schools, a project to make musical instruments out of recycled materials and school children taking part in conservation projects. Councillor Blanksby added: “We want to raise the profile among the residents of the city and get ideas from them. We will also be taking to groups and carry out projects with them to improve waste management.” One organisation which is planning to get involved in the project is the Play and Recycling Centre in Werburgh Street, Derby. The group recycles waste from industry such as plastic, cardboard, and paper, which is then reused to make toys for children. Centre co-ordinator Maureen Burgoyne said: “The project is a good idea because it lets people know about us and that there is another use for waste material - because waste for one person could be good for someone else.” Another organisation which is getting involved is the Padley Group which recycles textiles and clothing to help the city’s homeless. Director of the group Richard Jones said: “We work in partnership with the council on our kerbside textile collection scheme, which I feel great about about, because we are not only getting people to have work experience but people who donate the textiles know that they are helping homeless and disadvantaged people.” He added: “From a waste management point of view, I think that we have all got to think about this. In the future, the situation is going to get worse and we are going to run out of land which will become contaminated.” For more information about The Play and Recycling Centre call 299165 or for details about the Padley Group on 366780.


Author:
Paul Brown
Date:
July 27, 2000

Story

A PARENT and Toddler group in Sinfin face closure if more volunteers are not found soon. One of the group’s leaders Mrs Karen Bailey said yesterday: “If we don’t find volunteers, we will simply have to close. We can’t possibly do everything.” She added: “They’re such a big, smashing group and we always have a great time. The kids have got so much to do. They go on organised trips, paint and have sing-alongs.” The group, which has been together for three and a half years, have already had two volunteers drop out this year. They initially started looking for help a month ago but the lack of assistance has got so bad that it is now an urgent problem. Some volunteers have already come forward but the team is still seriously under-staffed and looking for more help. They want to set up a rota system for the volunteers so tasks can be allocated. Mrs Bailey added: “They would be making tea, coffee and soft drinks and generally helping out wherever they can. We already do that and collect money at the door. It will definitely ease the pressure for us. There is no way we can do any more.” Mrs Bailey and fellow organiser Mrs LInda Gaskin have been associated with the group since its inception but have only taken over recently. The group meet on Thursdays (1.30-3.00pm) at Sinfin Moor Church on Arleston Lane, Sinfin. They have never cancelled a meeting because there are so many people involved that there isn’t enough time to inform everyone. Numbers attending the meetings vary from 20 to 35 parents and up to 40 toddlers. The next meeting will take place on September 7 because of the school holidays. If you would like to help, contact Karen Bailey on 762585 or Linda Gaskin on 764327.


Author:
Joanne Smith
Date:
July 20, 2000

Story

A NORMANTON man who has dedicated the past 27 years of his life to charity work is close to reaching his £100,000 target. Marcel Willems( 77) of Anchor Fold Close, will retire at Christmas and hopes to reach the magic total by then. This leaves him five months to raise the remaining £3,500. Marcel, who was born in Belgium, came to this country during the Second World War and was later given British citizenship. He spent over 20 years working as a newsagent at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary and has also spent many years delivering the Derby Trader. During his time at the newsagents, he discovered that old papers - valued at £48 per tonne - were being destroyed, and he recognised that the coupons contained within could be saved and used for charitable means. He then began regular raffles and a number of other fundraising activities sprang from there, including a bike ride to Skegness to help send people to Lourdes, and the continuing weekend raffles. Some of the many causes to have benefited from his efforts over the years are the DRI’s body scanner and the Nimbus beds appeal. Both staff and patients at the DRI have said they will be sorry to see him go but Marcel, who was presented with a Civic Award for his fundraising on his 70th birthday, has decided the time is fast approaching when he will call it a day. When asked what had inspired his fundraising efforts over the years, Marcel explained: “When I was a child growing up in Belgium, I was often asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. “I believed that I wanted to be a missionary, and that’s where the charity in me came from. I am confident that by Christmas I will have achieved my personal target of raising £100,000.” Julie Acred, chief executive of the Hospital Trust, added: “For over 30 years, Marcel has raised a staggering amount of money for both the DRI and the City General Hospital. “His fundraising has helped the renal unit and the opthamology department, as well as a range of other areas. We are enormously grateful for all of his excellent work and wish him a long and happy retirement.”


Author:
Steve Eyley
Date:
July 13, 2000

Story

A CHILDMINDER has demanded immediate action before motorists cause a tragic accident on a Sinfin road. Linda Gaskin, of Sinclair Close, has collected almost 200 signatures on a petition from parents and residents concerned about the situation on Redwood Road. She plans to hand it in to Derby City Council’s development and cultural services department today (Thursday). Road calming measures were introduced along nearby Grampian Way in April but this has prompted motorists to use Redwood Road as an alternative route, despite clear signs stating it is for access only, buses and cyclists. This has increased the volume of traffic along Redwood Road, and caused concern for those taking their children to nearby Redwood Nursery, Infant and Junior schools. Mrs Gaskin explained: “There is a sign up there with No Entry quite clearly written on it but people are ignoring it as they try to avoid the speed bumps. “What makes it worse is that they are speeding down there because they know they are in the wrong and don’t want to get caught. “There are lot of kids aged between 4-11 who have to cross over that road and there have already been a couple of near-misses because of all the cars speeding along. “The police have been along at various times to fine and warn people but they can’t be expected to be there all the time.” She has also been told that drivers are reluctant to travel along Grampian Way as the speed bumps are particularly high and they fear they could cause damage to their cars. Linda continued: “Since the introduction of traffic calming, the flow along Redwood Road of cars, lorries and vans has become horrendous, and we know they don’t all live along there. “The parents are 100 per cent behind this petition because, like me, they know how dangerous it can be to try and get their children across that road sometimes. “We feel that - kids being kids - there will be an accident along and we would like some alternative measures introduced before a tragedy occurs.” Pat Ethelston, chief engineer at Derby City Council, explained: “The speed bumps are designed to be effective, not to damage cars and they are off a standard size. “This is a long-standing problem which pre-dates the traffic calming measures and we are currently looking at ways in which we can improve the situation.”


Author:
Steve Eyley
Date:
July 6, 2000

Story

VOLUNTEER drivers are needed urgently to prevent the scaling down of a minibus service for Derbyshire’s blind residents. The Derbyshire Association for the Blind, which is based on Nottingham Road, Derby, operates its minibus service right across the county, transporting blind and visually impaired people to a number of social and sporting activities throughout the week. But a sudden shortage of volunteers means that some people may have to miss out if replacement drivers can’t be found soon. Len Briddon, minibus co-ordinator at the DAB, explained: “We rely heavily on volunteer drivers and at the moment, we are desperately short. Hundreds of people use this service each week. “We need another three or four people as some of our other drivers are not able to drive at the moment, because of health, employment or domestic reasons. “The service allows us to use a minibus to take people out and about during the week. It is particularly important on the sport and leisure side because on most days, we take people swimming, bowling, sailing, to social events, to the theatre, on trips out and to youth clubs. Mr Briddon continued: “It is likely that we will have to cut down on the services if we can’t get more drivers as soon as possible and that would be a shame because the minibus service helps a lot of people.” People living within reach of Derby would be ideal for the DAB’s needs and training in minibus driving will be provided, so a normal car licence will suffice for the moment. Len Briddon added: “Even if someone can give half a day a fortnight, that is fine. They don’t have to think it will be a fulltime commitment - they are voluntary after all. We would be grateful for as little or as much time as they can give.” If you think you can help the DAB, call Len Briddon now on (01332) 292262 for further details.


Author:
Steve Eyley
Date:
June 29, 2000

Story

A CHARITY rock concert has been organised as a big ‘thank you’ to the people who saved a Derby baby’s life. Edward Evans, of Otter Street, was taken seriously ill in February with Pneumococcal Meningitis. He was rushed to Derby Children’s Hospital and then transferred to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit at Nottingham University Hospital and to the city’s Queen’s Medical Centre. Although Edward, now aged 13 months, recovered, the long term effects of the illness are still being determined. He is partially deaf and is also being treated for epilepsy. The idea of doing something to reward the staff for their actions occurred to parents Sarah and Owen soon after Edward had been taken into hospital. As a result, the concert, called Songs For Eddie, is to be held on July 15 at St Alkmund’s Church, Derby. It will feature the four-piece band Karnage, who specialise in classic rock and who feature a certain Owen Evans on drums. Support comes from Kalm. Sarah Evans told The Trader: “When Edward went in and had to have an operation, the nurses told us he was very sick and later said they hadn’t really expected him to pull through - but he’s tough. “The QMC ward was very nicely done out but the parents’ waiting area seemed a little sad. The staff said they would like to revamp it if they could with things like a coat of paint, a microwave and a kettle and the idea sprang from there. “We want the money to help the people who saved Edward’s life and have looked after him since then. The hospital staff would say it was all in a day’s work but they helped us to cope by being so calm, professional and kind and we want to do something in return.” She added: “We would also like to think it will help parents who find themselves in a similar situation in the future” The concert gets under way at 8pm and tickets are available on the door, priced at £6.50. All money raised will go towards Nottingham University Hospital’s Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Ward E39 at the Queen’s Medical Centre, the Puffin Ward at Derby Children’s Hospital and The Mulberry Bush Day Nursery, who look after Edward during the day.


Author:
Trader reporter
Date:
June 15, 2000

Story

MUSIC & DANCE

FRIDAY, June 23: Musical minis, every Friday, The Play Cabin, Springwood Leisure Centre, Springwood Drive, Oakwood, 1.30-2.15pm, tel Brenda Butler 01773 880438. Derby Maxwell Society Scottish country dancing classes, St Peter’s Church Hall, Littleover, for adults 7.45-10pm, £1.50; for children 7-7.45pm, 70p, tel 513807. Nunsfield House Amateur Radio Group Club Programme, 8pm, Rally post mortem.

SATURDAY, June 24: Nicholas Martin, from Turner's Merry-go-Round in concert, Congregational Church, Green Lane, Belper, 7.30pm, presented by Belper and District Organ and Keyboard Club, £4, tel 01773 823454. Bach in B Minor, The Derwent Singers, soloists by courtesy of The Royal Northern College of Music, Derby Cathedral, 7.30pm, tickets £9 (reserved) and £7 from Foulds, Irongate, choir members and on the door.

MONDAY, June 19: Sequence dancing with instructions, Spondon Village Hall, 10am-noon, instructions for mixed abilities, £1.50, including refreshments.

TUESDAY, June 20: Singers Night, Belper Folk Club, Old King's Head, Days Lane, Belper, 8.30pm.

THURSDAY, June 22: Musical minis every Thursday, St Nicholas Church Hall, Allestree Lane, Allestree, 10-10.45am, and The Fleet Arts Project, The Fleet, Belper, 1.30-2.15pm and 2.30-3.15pm.

OUT & ABOUT

FRIDAY, June 16: Every Friday morning, 9.30am-12.30pm, Take A Break Women’s Voluntary Group coffee morning, No.1 Community Centre, 1 St Chad’s Road, tel Nasreen 736866. Central Derby Millennium Festival fashion show, Firs Estate School, 7-9pm, tickets £1.50 adults (children free) from school, proceeds to school funds. Flower festival, St Wilfred's Church, Barrow on Trent, 10am-6pm (also Saturday and Sunday). Flower festival St Martin's Methodist Church, Flint Street, Allenton, 10.30am-5pm (Sunday 4-6pm, Monday 10.30-3.30pm). City of Derby Age Concern coffee morning, Derby Central Library Committee Room, Strand Entrance, 10am-noon, 30p for tea, coffee and biscuits.

SATURDAY, June 17: Community ramble, meet Duffield Station car park, 1.30pm, four and half mile ramble will start at Moor Lane, Dale Village, 2pm (SK 436 390), tel 840076. Poetic Justice - explored in song, music and poetry by Belper Poetry Lover's Club and the Rough Truffles in collaboration with Belper Amnesty Group, St Swithun's Church, Holbrook Road, Belper, 7.30pm, admission £2, under 12s free, tel 01332 840360. Summer fair, All Saints' Church, Mackworth Village, Church Hall, Lower Road, Mackworth, 2.30pm, admission 20p. Summer fair, Carlyle Infant School, Carlisle Avenue, Littleover, 11am-2pm, opened by Rammie. Auction of assorted items, The United Reformed Church, Becket Well Lane, viewing noon-12.45pm, auction 12.45pm onwards, booklets £1 ( including admission), available on or the door in advance from Sue Hulley, 42 St Albans Road, tel 342136 and Chris Holt, 49 Rowditch Avenue, tel 365310, in aid of St Francis Hospice For Cats. Markeaton Primary School PTFA summer fair, Newton's Walk, Bromley Street, 2-4pm, adults 50p, children 25p. Chellaston Methodist (High Street) sale, 10.30am-1.45pm, lunches and usual stalls. Sunflower fete and bungee jump, Treetops Hospice, Derby Road, Risley, noon -4pm. Ecclesbourne P.T.A. jumble sale, 2pm, admission 20p.

SUNDAY, June 18: Ramstock Carnival, Stockbrook Recreation Ground, 11am-5pm.

MONDAY, June 19: Association of Retired People and Over 50s meeting, Royal Banqueting Suite, Victoria Street, 2pm (lunch from noon). The International Friendship League, Derby branch, The Osnabruck Room, Derby Labour Club, Charnwood Street, 8pm, £1, visitors £1.50, Some Notable Derbyshire Personalities by Mrs Joan Ward.

TUESDAY, June 20: Allestree Flower Group, Evergreen Hall, Cornhill, 7.30pm, demonstration by Andrew Clifton on Natures Flowers.

WEDNESDAY, June 21: Derby Focus Activities Club for active professional people meets every Wednesday, 8.45pm, Park Farm Hotel, Allestree, telephone Janine on 731160 or Dudley 541102. Jumble sale, Elvaston District Guides in aid of Peak 200 fund, St Michael's Hall, Elvaston Lane, Alvaston, 1.30pm, admission 10p. Mackworth Live At Home coffee morning, Methodist Church, Prince Charles Avenue, Mackworth, 10.30am-noon, 25p. St Edmund's PreSchool Playgroup open day, St Edmund's Church Hall, 18 Kings Croft, Allestree, 9.30-10.30am for parents with children three and half years and older, 1.15-2.15pm for parents with children between two and half and five.

THURSDAY, June 22: Derbyshire Historic Gardens, social evening at Cashel, Kirk Ireton, garden of Anita and Jeremy Butt

KIDS STUFF

SUNDAY, June 18: Derby Soft Play, Mickleover Community Centre, 10.30am-2pm, admission £1.85 per child, unlimited play time, tel 513226.

MONDAY, June 19: Derby Soft Play, Mickleover Community Centre, 10am-3pm, admission £1.85 per child, unlimited play time, tel 513226.

TUESDAY, June 20: Rascals and Angels Mother and Toddler Group meets every Tuesday at St John's Methodist Church, Birchover Way, Allestree, 1-3pm, tel Gill 551574. Mackworth Soft Play meets every week at St Francis’ Church Hall, Prince Charles Avenue, 10am-2pm. Parent and toddler group, Salvation Army, The Spot, 9.30-11.30am, tel 513948.

WEDNESDAY, June 21: Mackworth Playgroup, every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9.30-11.30am at St Francis's Church Hall, tel Angie McGee on 360853 Derby Gingerbread Group for lone parents and their children meets every Wednesday, St Alkmund’s Church, Kedleston Road, 6.30-8.30pm, tel Charles 725158. Storytime for under fives, every Wednesday, Peartree Library, Peartree Road, 2-2.45pm, parents and carers. Mackworth Community Centre parents and toddlers coffee morning, every Wednesday, 10.30am-1pm, £1 including coffee and one child's play.

THURSDAY, June 22: Derby Soft Play, Mickleover Community Centre, 10am-3pm, admission £1.85 per child, unlimited play time, tel 513226.

CHURCHES

SATURDAY, June 17: Central Spiritualist Hall, Forester Street, Robert Myatt from Northants, donation £2 (spiritual healing Tuesdays 2pm, Fridays 6.30pm) tel 517982. SUNDAY, June 18: Annual pilgrimage to Rodsley, birthplace of St Ralph Sherwin, led by the Rt Rev James McGuinness, Bishop of Nottingham, speaker Rev N McLaughlin, meet at Rodsley crossroads 3pm.

MONDAY, June 19: St Luke's Derby, Walsingham Festival, 7.30pm, preacher Father Daniel of Russian Orthodox Church.


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
June 15, 2000

Story

DERBY’S Council leader says he would like to see the city become the hub of people’s lives. Councillor Robert Jones’s comments came on the eve of Derby City Partnerships’s 2020 Vision week from June 19-25, which aims to raise the profile of the city. Councillor Jones told the Trader: “The strap line to the campaign has always been to make Derby a top 10 city by the year 2020, and that’s what the slogan is all about.” He continued: “The city has to have a place for all its people to work, and I would like it to be a place that not only people work in but they use for their leisure and shopping - as the hub of their lives - which it already is for a lot of people.” He added: “ Derby has got great opportunities in front of it and I think these will be realised. Many things are improving - people who visit me from outside the city and have not been for a while have a positive picture of the place. Derby has got a lot going for it. ” As part of the partnership’s 25-year plan to improve the city - in which the seven day trading has already been achieved along with 5,000 extra jobs - a number of events will take place next week. These will include the official launch of the Main Trail pedestrian/cycle route from the railway station to the city centre which includes CCTV television, the Derby City Curry Chef 2000 competition final and the SciTec 2000 annual science festival at the University of Derby. For more details on week’s events telephone 386572 or pick up a brochure from the Tourist Information Centre near the Assembly Rooms. • It was announced on Wednesday that one of Derby’s poorest areas could be a step closer to securing £50 million of funding over the next 10 years. Under the Government’s new deal for communities, a community-based partnership in the Derwent ward - overseen by the Derby City Partnership - is being awarded a £200,00 to put together a detailed delivery plan in a bid to gain funding.


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
May 25 2000

Story

DERBY’S Mayor has raised more than £90,000 for good causes in the city - more than trebling her original target! Councillor Sara Bolton initially set out to raise £25,000 for Derby City General Hospital’s Baby Care Unit, Derby Age Concern, The Samaritans, the city hospital’s Breast Test Appeal and Derby Drugline. But, as her fundraising momentum picked up, the Mayor announced in January that she would double her appeal to £50,000. When the funds were counted up on Tuesday - before they were distributed - it was discovered that the Mayor had more than trebled her original target. She told the Trader: “I was amazed - staggered. I knew that I had trebled my target but I could not believe that it was in the £90,000’s.” She continued: “It’s a great way to end the year, and it’s so satisfying that I can distribute this amount of money in Derby. Because I raised more than I had originally planned, I have also been able to help other groups and charities such as the Cathedral Plus Fund, The Ukrainian Dance Ensemble, the Derby Brittle Bone Society as well as scout groups and playgroups.” After an exhaustive year in which she only had one day off, Councillor Bolton says she’s looking forward to getting her life back. She said: “I’m looking forward to spending some time with my family and going out for meals with friends. “I have had no social life at all for the past year because I have been dedicated to my mayoral duties. If I wanted to have my hair cut or get my legs waxed, I had to check my engagement sheet first.” She continued: “It’s been hectic and I’ve enjoyed every minute, but I’ve got to be honest - I’m exhausted. I’ve only had one day off in the past year, so the first thing I’m going to do is go on holiday to Scotland for two weeks, which I’m looking forward to.” She added: “It’s been a year that I will never forget and I’ve got lots of photographs to remind me of it in years to come. I’ll probably feel emotional, but I have known all along that it would only be for a year. It will also come as a bit of a relief because you can’t carry on at the pace I have for more than a year.” Councillor Bolton - who is the Labour councillor for Chaddesden - will be replaced by the Labour councillor for Babington Ashok Kalia as Mayor of Derby today (Thursday).


Author:
Steve Eyley
Date:
May 18, 2000

Story

A DERBY woman is set to embark on a trek to China in aid of underprivileged children. Jackie Plaskett (43) from Littleover needs to raise £2,000 by the end of the month to enable her to join the European Children’s Trust’s China Trek 2000, which will take place in September. The trip, which promises to be both physically and mentally demanding, will take in the Yun Meng Shan Forest Park, the Great Wall of China, Badaling and Waterfall Park. But before Jackie plans any further ahead, she must raise another £600 in sponsorship. All money raised will go straight to the European Children’s Trust, which was set up in 1990 as the Romanian Orphanage Trust. More than one million children in eastern and central Europe live in conditions of deprivation. Many are orphans, while others have parents who are simply too poor to support them. The ECT’s main aim is to promote reformed childcare systems across Europe, and it is for this reason that Jackie Plaskett intends to raise £2000. She explained: “About 10 years ago, there was a lot of publicity surrounding Romania and the orphanages there, when the country was opened up to the West. “The children had had very little human contact and had been kept like animals in a zoo. It was heartbreaking to see images like that on the news and so I sent in some money and kept in touch over the years. “The money raised in sponsorship for the trek will go to a very good cause but I am still around £600 short and time is running out so I hope that people will give to a very good cause.” If you would like to support the ECT’s China Trek 2000 by sponsoring Jackie, send your cheques, made payable to The European Children’s Trust, to Jackie at The Cedars, 20 Farley Road, Derby, DE23 6BX. In addition, a Charity Fun Day is taking place this Sunday at the Derbyshire Tennis Centre, Ashe Place, Vincent Street, Derby. A sponsored singles rally event is being held and all money will go the ECT. If you would like to find out how to get a sponsorship form, call the Derbyshire Tennis Centre on (01332) 273770.


Author:
Trader Reporter
Date:
12/05/00

Story

THE final jigsaw in the Pride Park project looks set to be completed. A £1.9 million investment towards the costs of the Wilmorton Link road on to Pride Park was announced on Monday. English Partnerships has approved funding from its Partnership Investment Programme. The project will be delivered by the East Midlands Development Agency (EMDA) and Derby City Council following ongoing negotiations. The road is the final link to the prestigious development site and will join Pride Park to the A6 London Road at Wilmorton. Its completion will unblock the remaining 20 acres of land on the site for development. City council leader Councillor Robert Jones said: “I am delighted we have been told by the EMDA that we are to receive a £1.9 million funding package towards the £5 million cost of the project. It is excellent news for Derby. “We can now start the necessary preparatory work prior to inviting tenders. We hope to have work starting on site in September. This important road, together with the bridge over the railway line, should be built by August 2001, completing the final piece of the jigsaw of the infrastructure to Pride Park. “It will open up the rest of the land to development and help traffic movements in that area. The city council puts great emphasis on public transport through Pride Park and we are sure the new link will relieve congestion on London Road and around the rail station.” East Midlands Development Agency Director of Regeneration and Rural Affairs John Nicholls said: “We are delighted to help make this project possible. It will reinforce the success of Pride Park and bring the important project closer to completion. “This is an early and positive step in our Economic Strategy which stresses sustainable development in the region’s cities.”


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
May 4, 2000

Story

LUCK really smiled on Herbie Hartwig when he took a dip! Mr Hartwig (45), from Sinfin, who works as a car park attendant at Asda, was given a £1 tip after helping a customer. He spent the £1 tip on a Lottery lucky dip ticket and ended up with five numbers and £1,090! 

Mr Hartwig was given the tip after he helped a female shopper by putting away her trolley. This was sometime between 6.30pm and 7pm last Wednesday, and when Mr Hartwig went to give the woman her £1 back, she told him to keep it as a thank you. He told the Trader: “I was at a friend’s house when the Lottery results were on and just caught a glimpse of a few of the numbers. 

I was really pleased because I thought I had won a tenner. “I went to Forbuoys in Arleston Lane before going to work the next day to see if I had won anything and when the girl ran my ticket through the till she went and fetched the manager.” He continued: “The manager asked me how much I thought I’d won and I said £10. He said ‘I think you’ve won a bit more than that.’ I got a bit panicky when he said this. He then discreetly called me over and showed me a print-out of the amount I won.” He added: “I couldn’t believe it - I went into work and was absolutely elated all day - I couldn’t stop thinking about what I wanted to spend it on.” Mr Hartwig says he would like to find the lady in the car park and give her £50 by way of a thank you. 

He said: “I would just like to thank her very much for her generosity - she does not know how much she has helped me out. I haven’t lived in my house for very long and it hasn’t got any carpets - the money will really help me out.”


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
April 20, 2000

Story

ROLLS-ROYCE union members went on an unofficial strike on Tuesday inorder to protest against compulsory redundancies. Over 2,000 staff gathered at Osmaston Park at midday to attend a mass meeting led by the MSF, the union for skilled and professional people. The reason for the gathering was to bring workers up to date about issues and to let the company know that they are unhappy about the current situation.Workers want to avoid compulsory redundancies and hope to be able to negotiate with management at Rolls-royce, but will consider industrial action and a united protest if changes are not made. Rolls-Royce plans to make about 1,000 of it’s staff redundant in Derby. The company intends to make the redundancies compulsory and is claimed to be refusing to discuss the matter with unions.Management argue that the cuts are necessary inorder to lessen costs and counter a global downturn in large civil engine orders. Don King, chief negotiator for MSF staff argued that Rolls- Royce is a quality product which is delivered by a satisfactory workforce who deserve a better management who treats them better and which takes a long term view. He stressed that redundancies would force a 10-30% reduction in Man power. He added, “The implication( of redundancies) affects the community and businesses around Rolls-Royce . We want to get more work around the airline for job security” Also Steve Joy, union convenor representing manual staff in Derby has said “Rolls-Royce is taking its workforce for granted. We cannot stand by and watch the company sack their loyal and dedicated staff just to increase the share price.” Staff at Rolls- Royce are also extremely angered. Derek George(49) , shop stewart at PSC Building on Wilmore Road, from Alvaston said that he has worked with the company for either 21 or 22 years and feels that the situation is quite sad and unfair because people have been loyal to Rolls- Royce and it is their future. Another worker argued that working class people will greatly suffer especially their families. He said he has worked for the firm for over 20 years and has done a quality job and there is plenty of work to keep staff in employment. He feels that the situation is disgraceful and unacceptable.


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
13/4/00

Story

BY CLARE CULLY

AN AVERAGE of 13 asylum seekers are being housed in Derby every week, according to the city council. In December, the council agreed to take up to 25 asylum seekers a week to relieve pressure on the London boroughs. But until last month, an average of only six asylum seekers were coming to the city each week - a total of 115 since December. Approximately 95 per cent of these were Kosovan. Malcolm Newsam, assistant director of adult services in the city council’s social services department said that many asylum seekers were reluctant to leave London. He told the Trader: “If an asylum seeker goes into a London Borough social services department and claims destitution, they are told that support will be provided for them but that it may be in Newcastle, Derby or other regions. At that point, the asylum worker will look on their board of local authorities to see which ones are offering assistance.” He continued: “Some people say they are destitute and need support, and as soon as they are told that they will be dispersed out of London, they don’t come back to the social services office. It may be that they have family in London and would rather rely on their support than move away from them to Derby or any other areas out of London.” The city council only accepts asylum seekers from from the former Yugoslavia Republic - Bosnia and Kosovo, the Asian subcontinent, China and Vietnam. This is because there are already interpreters, existing networks and communities for these nationalities in the city. Mr Newsam added: “What we have done in Derby is manage the process so that we only accept the number of asylum seekers that we can reasonably accommodate in reasonable accommodation.” The council will continue to offer housing for 25 asylum seekers a week until new government rules are implemented later in the year. At the moment, any asylum seekers who claim asylum at their port of entry are dealt with by the Home Office. Asylum seekers who claim asylum once in the country are cared for by the relevant local authority. Council’s are currently refunded by the Home Office, but when the new rules are implemented - possibly in October - all asylum seekers will be paid for and housed directly by the Home Office.


Author:
CLARE CULLY
Date:
6-4-2000

Story

BY CLARE CULLY

A DERBY pensioner is calling for more privacy for mourners at Markeaton Crematorium. Norman Beckett (80) of Gilbert Street, Allenton, has been a mourner at the crematorium 19 times this year, and believes it needs to be made more private. He campaigned in 1994 to raise cash for a stained glass window to be fitted for extra privacy at the chapel - which was installed at the end of 1996. Derby City Council is now raising funds to fit a further partially stained glass window, which look out on the chapel’s terrace garden. The window, which is made up of three sections, will depict the four seasons - but Mr Beckett said it will not create enough privacy for mourners in the chapel. He told the Trader: “The stained glass window the council are proposing will not create enough privacy. You will still be able to see through it. You will be able to see the mourners from the previous funeral and the gardener gardening outside.” He continued: “It’s just not a holy place because mourners cannot grieve in private.” He added: “The new window should be all stained glass. I know that it can’t depict a religious scene because of all the religious denominations that use the chapel but the present design does not give enough privacy.” Derby City Council’s head of Parks Services Peter Benham said: “To make the windows fully stained would cut out the natural light. The sun comes around that side of the chapel and creates some ambience in the chapel itself.” He continued: “The garden is a very tranquil feature. What is the point in having a garden there if you make the whole place dark and dull?” He added: “I am sure a lot of people would still like to see the garden while they are in the chapel, and we have to take their views on board as well. A lot of people like to look out at the fountain which signifies all sorts of things such as the fountain of life.” The new window - which will cost £30,000 - will be entirely paid for by donations. Those who donate £250 will receive a photograph of the finished window, and those who donate £500 will also have the name of their loved one inscribed on a memorial plaque in the chapel entrance. For a leaflet containing details on how to donate telephone the crematorium on 341012. What do you think about Mr Beckett’s comments? Let us know by writing to letters to the editor at The Trader, 52 Babington Lane, Derby, DE1 1SX.

(Pic cap 1) The design for the new window by local artist Sarah McNicholl.

(Pic cap 2) Mr Beckett sits in front of the window at the chapel.


Author:
Steve Eyley
Date:
March 30, 2000

Story

BY STEVE EYLEY

A DAREDEVIL 75 year-old Alvaston woman is to abseil down the side of a building for a Derby-based national charity. Joyce Colledge, of Warren Street, has been recently installed as chairman of the Myasthenia Gravis Association, a group which started in Derby 26 years ago and currently has 40 branches nationwide. On April 15, Joyce plans to take a step into the unknown by abseiling 100 feet down the side of John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, where the group’s national conference will be taking place. Joyce, an abseiling novice, told The Trader: “So far, I haven’t really had any training for the abseil and although I am looking forward to it, I am a little bit apprehensive. “I have raised £150 so far in sponsorship money and I would obviously like to raise as much as possible between now and April 15. “The hospital is where a lot of the research into Mysathenia Gravis has taken place over the years. In the last two years, the group has held a charity plane pull and tank pull but one of the regional organisers came up with this idea for this year. “I thought that I might as well do it as I intended to be there anyway and a hospital is a good place to be in case anything happens!” Joining Joyce on the abseil will be treasurer Frances Leaman from Calverton and secretary Shona Crump from Nottingham, both of whom are Myasthenics. Joyce continued: “I don’t think Myasthenia Gravis is well enough known and that is why we are trying to get as much publicity for it as possible. I have sponsored plenty of other people before and I hoping that my friends will be prepared to sponsor me this time round.” If anyone would like to sponsor Joyce’s intrepid abseiling effort, they can call her on (01332) 571078 or contact her at the Myasthenia Gravis Association office on (01332) 290219.


Author:
Steve Eyley
Date:
March 23, 2000

Story

BY STEVE EYLEY

A £5,000 reward was yesterday (Wednesday) offered by police investigating the ‘severed head’ murder of Craig Wojcik, who had links with drugs and Derby’s gay community. The severed head of Mr Wojcik, formerly of Coleraine Close, Chaddesden, was discovered last Wednesday by two children next to the railway line at the rear of the West Meadows Industrial Estate. He had been reported missing from home in August of last year, when he was 19, and forensic examinations are being carried out to determine how long Mr Wojcik had been dead. • Following the discovery of the head, an incident room was immediately set up at Cotton Lane Police Station. More than 60 officers are currently involved, under the command of Detective Superintendent Keiron Wright. In addition, 25 officers have been deployed to carry out a thorough search of land near to where the head was found. • Friday afternoon saw Craig Wojcik’s mother, Denise Wojcik, make an emotional public appeal for information that would help police officers find the rest of her son’s body. She spoke of her disbelief that anyone could do something like this to her son and demanded that justice be done. • On Saturday afternoon, the investigation team targeted Derby County’s Pride Park stadium, putting up posters asking the 33,000 football fans present for any light they could shed on the murder. • Sunday and Monday saw police divers searching water-filled gravel pits near where the head was found, in an attempt to find the missing body. Bones were recovered but they were later confirmed as being animal remains. • By Tuesday, police officers were revealing that they believed Mr Wojcik’s head had been dumped at the back of the West Meadows Industrial Estate just a few days before its discovery. On Wednesday, it was revealed inquiries had indicated Mr Wojcik had mixed within the local gay communities. It was also known that he had been directly involved with the drug scene and was receiving specialist treatment for problems relating to this at the time of his disappearance. Detective Superintendent Keiron Wright said: “At this stage of the inquiry, I am still not able to answer my three original questions - why was Craig killed, where is his body and who killed him? "My team has various leads to follow up and these include speaking separately to members of both the gay communities and local people with drug connections." He added: "At the moment, I am keeping an open mind but would encourage anyone with information to come forward. They may hold the key that helps us to solve this puzzle." With the £5,000 reward now available for information leading to the arrest of the person or persons responsible, you can ring the incident room hotline on (01332) 222111 or ring Crimestoppers in confidence on (0800) 555111. Alternatively, information can be passed in confidence through Derby Friend on (01332) 349333 or Derby Drugs Helpline on (01332) 382954. The drug helpline number will only be available until March 31. Pic caption: Craig Wojcik, whose head was found near a railway line at the rear of the West Meadows Industrial Estate.


Author:
Clare Cully
Date:
10/03/2000

Story

CRIME reduction information packs will be delivered to a selection of homes in Ockbrook and Borrowash in an attempt to cut domestic burglaries. 

The packs, which will initially be delivered to approximately 200 homes, are part of a joint project between police and the villages’ Neighbourhood Watch scheme.

They will contain advice along with details on how to get free crime prevention surveys carried out at homes. The scheme is the first crime prevention project of the year for the Neighbourhood Watch and comes after there were 70 burglaries in February in the Long Eaton Police section - which also covers Ockbrook and Borrowash. This figure is three times the number of burglaries which took place in the section in the same period last year. 

Police area manager for Ockbrook and Borrowash PC Mark Phillips said: “Often the householder only upgrades their security after they have been a victim of crime. 

The police would like everyone to check their own individual security at their homes." He added: “With the increased pressure to reduce and detect more burglaries, the police feel that the householder has got to take responsibility for security. So often, we find that in domestic burglaries, the burglar had easy access to the property.” Secretary of the Ockbrook and Borrowash Neighbourhood Watch group Val Billings said: “We have already tackled car crime and distraction and bogus burglaries, and really, it’s tied in with the fact that the Home Office is pushing different initiatives against burglaries on dwellings. 

This is something that actually affects quite a few people and is quite easy to do something about." She added: “It’s difficult to say whether the packs will work, but we work on the premise that if they prevent one burglary it’s been worth it. I think Neighbourhood Watch has an important role in Ockbrook and Borrowash so people will take on board the advice.”


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